Top Ten Tuesday: Books on my Autumn TBR List

Top Ten Tuesday was created by The Broke and the Bookish in June of 2010 and was moved to That Artsy Reader Girl in January of 2018. It was born of a love of lists, a love of books, and a desire to bring bookish friends together.

I know, I know!

I am a Brit and along with my love of tea, I love those British words that never quite made the transition over the Atlantic: it will always be a fortnight, not two weeks; trousers, not pants; courgettes and aubergines will never be replaced by zucchinis and eggplants. And Autumn will always be Autumn and not Fall. Sorry.

Anyway, mu Autumnal TBR generally comprises whatever books on the Booker Longlist I have not yet read. And this year, I have perhaps overreached a little on Netgalley so I have barely begun!

Booker Longlist Catch Up

Frankissstein, Jeanette Winterson

Love the opening chapter of this one and looking forward to diving into it in the October half term.

In Brexit Britain, a young transgender doctor called Ry is falling in love – against their better judgement – with Victor Stein, a celebrated professor leading the public debate around AI.
Meanwhile, Ron Lord, just divorced and living with Mum again, is set to make his fortune launching a new generation of sex dolls for lonely men everywhere.
Across the Atlantic, in Phoenix, Arizona, a cryonics facility houses dozens of bodies of men and women who are medically and legally dead… but waiting to return to life.
But the scene is set in 1816, when nineteen-year-old Mary Shelley writes a story about creating a non-biological life-form. ‘Beware, for I am fearless and therefore powerful.’
What will happen when homo sapiens is no longer the smartest being on the planet? Jeanette Winterson shows us how much closer we are to that future than we realise. Funny and furious, bold and clear-sighted, Frankissstein is a love story about life itself.

Lost Children Archive, Valeria Luiselli

A family in New York packs the car and sets out on a road trip. A mother, a father, a boy and a girl, they head south west, to the Apacheria, the regions of the US which used to be Mexico. They drive for hours through desert and mountains. They stop at diners when they’re hungry and sleep in motels when it gets dark. The little girl tells surreal knock knock jokes and makes them all laugh. The little boy educates them all and corrects them when they’re wrong. The mother and the father are barely speaking to each other.
Meanwhile, thousands of children are journeying north, travelling to the US border from Central America and Mexico. A grandmother or aunt has packed a backpack for them, putting in a bible, one toy, some clean underwear. They have been met by a coyote: a man who speaks to them roughly and frightens them. They cross a river on rubber tubing and walk for days, saving whatever food and water they can. Then they climb to the top of a train and travel precariously in the open container on top. Not all of them will make it to the border.
In a breath-taking feat of literary virtuosity, Lost Children Archive intertwines these two journeys to create a masterful novel full of echoes and reflections – a moving, powerful, urgent story about what it is to be human in an inhuman world.

Amazon

The Testaments, Margaret Atwood

More than fifteen years after the events of The Handmaid’s Tale, the theocratic regime of the Republic of Gilead maintains its grip on power, but there are signs it is beginning to rot from within. At this crucial moment, the lives of three radically different women converge, with potentially explosive results.

Two have grown up as part of the first generation to come of age in the new order. The testimonies of these two young women are joined by a third voice: a woman who wields power through the ruthless accumulation and deployment of secrets.

As Atwood unfolds The Testaments, she opens up the innermost workings of Gilead as each woman is forced to come to terms with who she is, and how far she will go for what she believes.

‘Dear Readers: Everything you’ve ever asked me about Gilead and its inner workings is the inspiration for this book. Well, almost everything! The other inspiration is the world we’ve been living in.’ Margaret Atwood

Ducks, Newburyport, Lucy Ellmann

Latticing one cherry pie after another, an Ohio housewife tries to bridge the gaps between reality and the torrent of meaningless info that is the United States of America. She worries about her children, her dead parents, African elephants, the bedroom rituals of ‘happy couples’, Weapons of Mass Destruction, and how to hatch an abandoned wood pigeon egg. Is there some trick to surviving survivalists? School shootings? Medical debts? Franks ‘n’ beans? A scorching indictment of America’s barbarity, past and present, and a lament for the way we are sleepwalking into environmental disaster, Ducks, Newburyport is a heresy, a wonder – and a revolution in the novel.

Amazon

Quichotte, Salman Rushdie

Inspired by the Cervantes classic, Sam DuChamp, mediocre writer of spy thrillers, creates Quichotte, a courtly, addled salesman obsessed with television, who falls in impossible love with the TV star Salman R. Together with his (imaginary) son Sancho, Quichotte sets off on a picaresque quest across America to prove worthy of her hand, gallantly braving the tragicomic perils of an age where ‘Anything-Can-Happen’. Meanwhile his creator, in a midlife crisis, has equally urgent challenges of his own.

Just as Cervantes wrote Don Quixote to satirise the culture of his time, Rushdie takes the reader on a wild ride through a country on the verge of moral and spiritual collapse, with the kind of storytelling magic that is the hallmark of his work. The fully realised lives of DuChamp and Quichotte intertwine in a profoundly human quest for love and a wickedly entertaining portrait of an age in which fact is so often indiscernible from fiction.

An Orchestra of Minorities, Chigozie Obioma

A young farmer named Chinonso prevents a woman from falling to her death. Bonded by this strange night on the bridge, he and Ndali fall in love, but it is a mismatch according to her family who reject him because of his lowly status. Is it love or madness that makes Chinonso think he can change his destiny?
Set across Nigeria and Cyprus, An Orchestra of Minorities, written in the mythic style of the Igbo tradition, weaves a heart-wrenching tale about fate versus free will.

Beyond those, I am also planning – somehow – to find time for these as well:

The Animals at Lockwood Manor, Jane Healey

I got this one via NetGalley which adds a bit of pressure to reading it… but it also isn’t being published until March 2020, which takes some off again! I have started it and it seems… okay so far.

August 1939.
Thirty-year-old Hetty Cartwright is tasked with the evacuation and safekeeping of the natural history museum’s collection of mammals. Once she and her exhibits arrive at Lockwood Manor, however, where they are to stay for the duration of the war, Hetty soon realizes that she’s taken on more than she’d bargained for.
Protecting her charges from the irascible Lord Lockwood and resentful servants is work enough, but when some of the animals go missing, and worse, Hetty begins to suspect someone – or something – is stalking her through the darkened corridors of the house.
As the disasters mount, Hetty finds herself falling under the spell of Lucy, Lord Lockwood’s beautiful but clearly haunted daughter. But why is Lucy so traumatized? Does she know something she’s not telling? And is there any truth to local rumours of ghosts and curses?
Part love story, part mystery, The Animals at Lockwood Manor by Jane Healey is a gripping and atmospheric tale of family madness, long-buried secrets and hidden desires.

Daisy Jones and the Six, Taylor Jenkins Reid

This has crept up my TBR pile for Autumn, primarily based on the recommendations garnered last time I mentioned it on the blog as a book on my TBR list I was avoiding!

They were the new icons of rock and roll, fated to burn bright and not fade away.
But on 12 July 1979, it all came crashing down.

There was Daisy, rock and roll force of nature, brilliant songwriter and unapologetic drug addict, the half-feral child who rose to superstardom.

There was Camila, the frontman’s wife, too strong-willed to let the band implode – and all too aware of the electric connection between her husband and Daisy.

There was Karen, ice-cool keyboardist, a ferociously independent woman in a world that wasn’t ready for her.

And there were the men surrounding them: the feuding, egotistical Dunne brothers, the angry guitarist chafing on the sidelines, the drummer binge-drinking on his boat, the bassist trying to start a family amid a hedonistic world tour. They were creative minds striking sparks from each other, ready to go up in flames.

It’s never just about the music…

Amazon

The Seven Deaths of Evelyn Hardcastle, Stuart Turton

Tonight, Evelyn Hardcastle will be killed … Again
It is meant to be a celebration but it ends in tragedy. As fireworks explode overhead, Evelyn Hardcastle, the young and beautiful daughter of the house, is killed.
But Evelyn will not die just once. Until Aiden – one of the guests summoned to Blackheath for the party – can solve her murder, the day will repeat itself, over and over again. Every time ending with the fateful pistol shot.
The only way to break this cycle is to identify the killer. But each time the day begins again, Aiden wakes in the body of a different guest. And someone is determined to prevent him ever escaping Blackheath…

The Dreamers, Karen Thompson Walker

Being honest, I picked this one up from the local bookshop for one simple reason: I loved the cover! And I love the idea of exploring sleep, dreams, fantasy and reality – since reading Neil Gaiman’s Sandman.

Imagine a world where sleep could trap you, for days, for weeks, for months…

Karen Thompson Walker’s second novel tells the mesmerising story of a town transformed by a mystery illness that locks people in perpetual sleep and triggers extraordinary, life-altering dreams.
One night in an isolated college town in the hills of Southern California, a first-year student stumbles into her room and falls asleep. She sleeps through the morning, into the evening. Her roommate cannot rouse her. Neither can the paramedics, nor the perplexed doctors at the hospital. When a second girl falls asleep, and then a third, panic takes hold of the college and spreads to the town. A young couple tries to protect their newborn baby as the once-quiet streets descend into chaos. Two sisters turn to each other for comfort as their survivalist father prepares for disaster.
Written in luminous prose, The Dreamers is a breathtaking and beautiful novel, startling and provocative, about the possibilities contained within a human life if only we are awakened to them.

There are so many others that I am looking forward to or tempted by that whittling it down to just ten is difficult. Literally, in the course of writing this, I have downloaded the sequel books to Railhead by Philip Reeve, which I have warm memories of, prompted by another List Meme. Oh and I would like to see what the Lagercrantz continuation of the Millennium Trilogy is like….

Plus, plus, plus… and…

20 Comments Add yours

  1. _tirilu says:

    “The seven deaths of Evelyn Hardcastle” is on my wishlist. It sounds so much like an Agatha Christie novel with a fantasy twist. I hope you enjoy all of your autumn books. 🙂

    Like

  2. Noor Lightwood says:

    Daisy Jones & The Six is amazing.
    My TTT

    Like

  3. lydiaschoch says:

    The Testaments was amazing. (I have a review of it coming up on my blog in a few days!)

    And I’m not British, but I always say autumn instead of fall. It sounds nicer. 🙂

    My TTT.

    Like

    1. Wow… I might push Quihotte up the list a bit then! That and Daisy Jones seem to be getting most support

      Like

  4. It’s definitely hard to choose just ten. I really want to read Daisy Jones and The Seven Deaths of Evelyn Hardcastle.

    Like

    1. Just finding the time!! Gone are the days when I could devote a day to reading!! Kids stole that!

      Like

  5. Aymee says:

    A couple friends of mine raved about Daisy Jones & the Six, I hope you love it, too.

    Here is our Top Ten Tuesday. Thank you!

    Like

    1. Thanks! I’ll check it out as soon as I get time!

      Like

  6. brookelorren says:

    The Dreamers sounds interesting. I hope you like these books.

    Like

  7. inkandplasma says:

    I hadn’t heard of The Seven Deaths of Evelyn Hardcastle but now I DEFINITELY want to take a look, it sounds great. I’m hoping to pick up The Testaments soon, but my TBR is out of control already.

    Like

    1. And theres always a reason to add another: but I love this author; but I read book one and look, it’s book two; but the covers so pretty; but look, this one’s set in…. but, but, but… just one more….

      Liked by 1 person

      1. inkandplasma says:

        That sounds exactly like me, at work, justifying why I came back from my lunchbreak with four more books yesterday. And last week. And most weeks… but I definitely NEEDED these ones, okay….

        Liked by 1 person

  8. Americans use the term Autumn as well, just not as often as Fall 🙂

    I hope you enjoy your books!

    Happy TTT!

    Susan
    http://www.blogginboutbooks.com

    Like

  9. Patrick Prescott says:

    I’ve seen Salmon Rushdie on Bill Mahar a few times. Never read one of his books.

    Like

    1. He was the first book I read on my Uni course! Loved Midnight’s Children!

      Like

  10. Amber says:

    I’m reading Daisy Jones at the moment and I’m loving it!

    Liked by 1 person

  11. I cannot wait to read to Daisy Jones and the Six! I have it on hold at the library. It’s still a bunch of weeks left so I need to keep waiting 😭
    Genesis @ Whispering Chapters

    Liked by 1 person

  12. Good luck with your TBR!
    I loved Daisy Jones and the Six. The Seven Deaths of Evelyn Hardcastle was a DNF for me, but loads of people love it so I’m sure it’ll go better for you.
    Cora | http://www.teapartyprincess.co.uk

    Liked by 1 person

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