Worst Reads of 2013

Originally posted on The Book Lover's Musings:
So this is the corollary of the post 2013 in books. Not the best books I’ve read this year but the worst. Those books you read and think Well, that’s a week I’ll never get back again. Or those books you finish with a “meh” sound as…

The Rosie Project, Graeme Simsion

Well, that was a quick read! I was browsing various book lists with a view to spending some Christmas money and The Guardian’s Independent Bookshop review of 2013 cropped up with this book. It is, at heart, a romance novel which is certainly not a usual genre for me. The main character, Don Tillsen in…

2013 in books

Originally posted on The Book Lover's Musings:
2013 drags itself damply and limply to an end this week. Unlike Dr Who, whose Matt Smith incarnation went out on Christmas Day with a bang, the final days of 2013 remind me of the lines from Eliot This is the way the world ends This is…

The Twelve, Justin Cronin

It’s a strange thing with books. You can start one – particularly a lengthy one like this – and things get in the way of you finishing it. That’s not the strange thing. That – I imagine – is familiar. Maybe you put it down because work has become hectic or your baby is born…

Raising Steam, Terry Pratchett

You can’t go wrong with Pratchett: he never fails to offer up decent stories with a sparkle of wit, a smattering of engaging characters and a bucketload of humanity – in all its various forms and species! And Raising Steam continues the pattern: here, Ankh-Morpork’s journey towards modernity is quite literally driven by the arrival…

Adlestrop, Edward Thomas

Adlestrop Yes, I remember Adlestrop — The name, because one afternoon Of heat the express-train drew up there Unwontedly. It was late June. The steam hissed. Someone cleared his throat. No one left and no one came On the bare platform. What I saw Was Adlestrop — only the name And willows, willow-herb, and grass,…

Intertextuality in the The Woman in Black

Intertextuality is a strange idea. It’s reasonable and intuitive that texts refer both backwards and forwards within themselves: how many stories and tales begin and end at the same place and setting? Detective fiction is built on the importance of small early details turning into clues to be resolved later. Anton Chekov went so far…

Various Haunts Of Men, Susan Hill

I’ve enjoyed various Susan Hill novels: The Woman in Black and The Little Stranger in particular and so it was that I was looking forward to picking up on the Simon Serrailler crime series which I hadn’t come across before. In honesty, I picked up A Question of Identity first which is the seventh in…